Whistlepipe Gully HIke with dogs

Dog Hike Review: Whistlepipe Gully Kalamunda

The Hike

Length: 3.5 km
Estimated Time: ~ 1 hour depending on how much sniffing of the things
Route Type: lollipop walk (loop walk with a one-way section)
Free-range: Signposted as a on-lead walk but there were many off-lead doggos
Cardio rating: Moderate – a few small hills
Quality of Path: Narrow in sections with several rock scrambles required for smaller dogs
Navigation: Suggest a quick look at the track notes before you depart – multiple trails can make this walk a little confusing at points

Starting Point: western end of Orange Valley Road, Kalamunda or northern end of Lewis Road, Forrestfield
Swimming: There were several happy dogs swimming but suggest caution some sections had quite fast flowing water
Dog rating:  

Whistle Pipe Gully walk
Whistle Pipe Gully walk
Whistle Pipe Gully walk
Whistle Pipe Gully walk
Whistle Pipe Gully walk
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The Walk

We started the walk at the western end of Orange Valley Road, Kalamunda, where we encountered limited parking. The alternative start point is at the northern end of Lewis Road, Forrestfield, was less busy and also had a bin for dog poop… nobody wants to be carrying poop around in their pack all day. The walk is part of the Mundy Regional Park, which has several other paths and loops that would enable you to create longer walks (noting options that include Lesmurdie Falls are off-limits to dogs). There are also several creek crossings that could be used to create a shorter loop if starting from the Orange Valley Road entry.

Our second attempt to complete this walk was on an overcast Saturday afternoon in July. The track was still quite busy – largely families with small children and other dogs. It’s a a small slice of wilderness within suburbia with the bulk of the walk hugging the creek. The creek was flowing freely following recent rains and some sections were worthy of a photo-stop. Sections of the walk are over-grown with introduced species but it is still worth the effort for something so close to Perth. The wildflowers were just starting to emerge and can imagine that it would be spectacular in a few month’s time. The views back towards the Perth City that can be glimpsed from sections of the trail were amazing. There’s the remnants of a old house from the 1960s close to the Lewis Road entry. The views from here would make for a great picnic stop, however, I’d suggest being prepared for a few off-lead dogs that haven’t mastered their recall commands yet.

We did this short walk with just Zena and Brutus. Being chihuahuas, both skirted around all of the puddles and were not at all interested in going swimming. The narrow sections of the track required us to walk in single file, which can be a bit tricky at times when on-lead. Zena loved jumping all of the fallen trees – much more exciting than the agility section of a dog park. She also got excited in the sections that required scrambles over rocks. Brutus got a little tired towards the end of the walk and had his ‘can you carry me?’ face on. Understandable given he’d already been to puppy school in the morning with the lovely Kate from For Paws. A caution that we also attempted this walk the previous summer, where it was largely shady but both us and Zena found the open sections hard going. We had to stop regularly for water breaks to avoid her getting heat stroke.

Whistlepipe Gully HIke with dogs
Whistlepipe Gully HIke with dogs
Whistlepipe Gully HIke with dogs
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